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CREATIVITY NEWS

Best of the Cape: Designing South Africa's new national cocktail

Best of the Cape: Designing South Africa's new national cocktail

09/10/2013 - 15:11
While some countries are feted on the international cocktail circuit for their inventions, SA still goes bokkie. 021 asked Camps Bay’s best bartenders to get creative and design a national cocktail that South Africans could be proud of.  read more
THE LIGHT SIDE Don't ask me, I'm Dr.D: Why does the highway in town not connect?

THE LIGHT SIDE Don't ask me, I'm Dr.D: Why does the highway in town not connect?

08/10/2013 - 14:59
WHY DOES THE HIGHWAY IN TOWN NOT CONNECT?
- PAUL MITCHELL OF MITCHELL'S PLAIN read more
YUM YUM MAGGOTS - FOOD OF THE FUTURE

YUM YUM MAGGOTS - FOOD OF THE FUTURE

27/07/2013 - 10:51
021 asked Jason Drew about his fascination for maggots. He is involved with Agroprotein, who run a larvae and fruit-fly factory, currently producing one ton of maggots per week. At this stage, abattoir waste is used to feed the larvae, while at a later stage they will munch away on waste from ablution facilities. The maggots in turn are used to feed livestock, especially chicken. Currently about 1000 000 000 (1 billion) chickens are slaughtered each year in South Africa. A lot of their food is still sourced from fish, further depleting the oceans. read more
Eco fashion

Eco fashion

05/03/2013 - 20:03
Nature rubs shoulders with the city in Karolina Olowsdotter’s fashion label.

A Swedish fashion designer living in Cape Town, Karolina describes her label – Olowsdotter – as an eco-industrial look. This merging and clashing of contradictory elements expresses the duality felt by the 21st-century free-spirited nature lover who longs to feel the grass under her feet yet demands high-speed internet access 24/7.

Ecological principles affect every step of Karolina’s design process. Supporting and affiliating with other local industries is a primary concern. She buys local fabrics, mostly organic, and uses only natural fibres, which she embosses with intricate design details, such as poetry screen-printed onto the fabric.

The industrial aspect of her design comes through in the tailoring – the tuxedo style coats that reference a dandified life of high culture and the sharp lines with tucked waists that ask us to trade sandals for high heels.

Rather than following fickle trends, Karolina designs clothing that emphasises the feel-good factor. “I want people to wear my clothes because they make them feel at home in their skin,” she says.

And who would she love to see wearing her clothes? “Neneh Cherry – she's edgy, quirky and principled.”

Karolina recently showed her work at Design Indaba 2013.
 read more
Indigo Africa

Indigo Africa

04/03/2013 - 07:29
The earliest origins of isishweshwe (Xhosa ujamani; Afrikaans Duitse sis) can be traced back to the craze for colourful indiennes (Indian cottons) which spread like wildfire across Europe (even reaching the Cape) from the mid-1600s. In addition, vast quantities of indigo, until then extremely rare in Europe, were imported from India on new sea trade routes monopolised by the British and Dutch East India Companies. Europeans were now able to produce large amounts of a beautiful deep blue fabric.

In South Africa the identities of its wearers have changed from its context in trade and missionary-inspired Western dress to its active incorporation into traditional African rural customs, as a political statement by white women against apartheid, to its emergence on the international fashion circuit and latterly also as accessories. Increasingly today it is worn as everyday dress by South African women, irrespective of class, and more and more by men.

Today discharge-prints – in South Africa regarded as “real” isishweshwe – are made only at Da Gama Textiles in Zwelitsha near King William's Town.

At Iziko, an exhibition entitled The Shweshwe Story: Material Women? introduces the greater part of a collection of garments assembled by Dr Juliette Leeb-du Toit over a period of more than two decades. These are complemented by a range of photographic images and a selection of historical garments and images from Iziko’s own collection. This is the first in-depth exhibition of isishweshwe. Opened in February this year, the exhibition also coincides with the run-up to Cape Town’s reign as World Design Capital in 2014.
 read more
Best of the Cape: What makes people laugh

Best of the Cape: What makes people laugh

01/01/2013 - 00:00
Comedians know that using racial stereotypes will get them some laughs. But is this a
foolproof recipe? Is laughter just a smiling mask covering up our distress, or is it the cure that
frees us? 021 writer Tarryn Saunders asks a group of funny guys. read more
DEAF BOAT BUILDERS IN KHAYELITSHA

DEAF BOAT BUILDERS IN KHAYELITSHA

01/01/2013 - 00:00
Fancing idling about in a boat this summer? Deaf apprentices at Whispers Boat Building Academy are creating finely crafted rowing boats.  read more
GARDENING TRENDS

GARDENING TRENDS

03/09/2012 - 00:00
As most of the world struggles to get out of the recession, gardening continues to go green, edible, indigenous and more compact. David Davidson, awardwinning designer of sa’s Chelsea Flower Exhibit on display at Kirstenbosch this October, summarises the latest trends. As inner cities are being rejuvenated, people are swapping large houses and big gardens for lofts and penthouses. The result is that gardens, which used to be separate from people’s everyday life, have become as important as their living spaces. Inside and outside spaces have melded into one. The result is a huge demand for sculptural and architectural plants, such as aloes, cycads and other dramatic arid-region plants. Succulents are perfect. They are indigenous, water wise and low maintenance.  read more
Artisan bread

Artisan bread

28/05/2012 - 09:20
God bless the early morning bakers, I think, as I make my way to Kalk Bay’s C’est La Vie Bakery. It is 5am and the yellow light of the bakery reveals Jo Hill preparing her first batch of baguettes for the morning. Bread, which has been central to many cultures for millennia, has often wedged its way into religious symbolism, and that, I suppose, is why I am feeling pious before the sun has even risen. This bakery is one of many behind the revival of an ancient technique, slowly returning it to our modern lives. (Hallelujah!) read more
the best Markets

the best Markets

28/01/2012 - 10:58
here is a list of the best markets in Cape Town, the Winelands, and beyond

CBD: City Bowl Market on Hope
9am–2pm Saturdays
Housed in an exquisite old building with a fascinating history (formerly a Zionist
hall, Jehovah’s Witness church and Hindu temple) the City Bowl Market on Hope is
the place to meet friends and feed the family, while stocking the larder with a range
of home-made delicacies. It caters for the whole family with a garden and jungle
gym for the kids, draft beer for the dads and lots of goodies to tempt and torment the
fussiest of foodies. Plenty of parking available. Every fourth Saturday of the month
the City Bowl Fashion Market hosts more than 30 designers here.
14 Hope Street, Gardens, 073 270 8043, www.citybowlmarket.co.za read more
Creating an organic swimming pool

Creating an organic swimming pool

01/01/2012 - 00:00
The Cape Flats Fynbos Nursery manager, Neil Major, encourages landscapers and homeowners to embrace their fynbos heritage read more
CLARE MENCK

CLARE MENCK

01/01/2012 - 00:00
“Over the past two decades Clare Menck has begun to inscribe herself in the South African
world as one of this country’s most accomplished painters. Yet full and proper recognition
has eluded her. It is perhaps because of her use of smaller formats and the subjects that she
chooses that Clare Menck is known more by the critics and collectors than by museum and
exhibition curators. She has built up an impressive exhibition record and has demonstrated
that she is more than a superb painter.” Stephan Hundt, curator of the Sanlam Art Collection. read more
Pedro Espi-Sanchis on music education

Pedro Espi-Sanchis on music education

07/10/2011 - 12:20
I think that from earliest times people used sound to make life lighter to bear. Getting as many sounds as possible out of a piece of kelp is an example of ancient creativity. Along the shoreline of the Cape Peninsula the earliest hunters and gatherers collected clams and cooked them inside the fat part of the kelp. They might have used dried seaweed to make what today we call a vuvuzela. I imagine that people used their inventiveness to make sounds from found objects – much like the Zulus who create flutes from the stems of paw paws.  read more
BREAKING THE ICE – LEWIS PUGH

BREAKING THE ICE – LEWIS PUGH

21/10/2010 - 23:47
From Camps Bay, via the Arctic to 10 Downingstreet, 021 maps Lewis Pugh’s journey form cold water swimmer to environmental activist.

Meeting Lewis Gordon Pugh in person, it’s easy to fathom what drew him to the Arctic. His chiselled, cheek-boned, icemelting good looks cry out for a sleigh and a pack of huskies. His handshake, despite the wintry evening, is warm. But if you’ve swum one kilometre across the North Pole, surely even the chilliest Kalk Bay night would barely register.

You’ve certainly seen him. He’s the guy in the Investec advertisement who pops up between icebergs, causing you to choke on your popcorn in the movies. He’s the solitary figure swimming back and forth in Steenberg Dam before sunrise.
 read more
SP(R)OUTING HEALTH, WEALTH & WISDOM

SP(R)OUTING HEALTH, WEALTH & WISDOM

03/09/2010 - 00:00
Dawn Kennedy gets on the same wavelength as Cape Town ecopreneur Joseph Feigelson.
Joseph Feigelson is passionate about sprouts and eats nearly three hands full a day. It’s no wonder, 13 years ago they cured his debilitating heartburn. The alternative was acid reflux surgery, a rather unpleasant procedure. Since incorporating sprouts into his diet, Joseph has abundant energy and hasn’t spent a single day sick in bed.

As well as giving him back his health, sprouts have been sustaining Joseph financially and he has feathered his nest in the most novel way – with a home sprouting kit called Kitchen Garden. It’s ingenious in its incredible simplicity: a cardboard box containing six jam jars, some gauze, elastic bands, six packets of seed, a metal structure and a tray – everything you need to grow sprouts in the comfort of your kitchen – and it’s yours for R400. Within three days, having rinsed
your seeds twice daily and allowed them to drip-dry on the tray, you will have an abundance of edible sprouts; your very own garden in a jam jar. read more
PENINSULA SCHOOL FEEDING ASSOCIATION

PENINSULA SCHOOL FEEDING ASSOCIATION

15/10/2009 - 00:00
021 spotlights those who are making a difference in our communities. This month, we feature the Observatorybased Peninsula School Feeding Association. In 1958, when the Government
discontinued school feeding programmes, the Rotary Club of Paarden Eiland recognised the
dire need to alleviate hunger in schoolchildren and established the Peninsula School Feeding
Association (PSFA), a registered non-profit organisation. Recognising that ‘you can’t teach a hungry child’, the PSFA provides nutritional meals designed to meet a third of a child’s Recommended Daily Allowance.  read more
 
the cape town opera one & only rupert museum the fugard theatre addis in cape cape philharmonic orchestra cape town ballet cape tourist guide connection Grand West Casino sanlam village & life aubergine iziko kirstenbosch gardens baxter theatre table mountain aerial cableway arts and culture artscape rust en vrede south african national parks vida cafe