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NATURE NEWS

New Cape West Coast Biodiversity Corridor

New Cape West Coast Biodiversity Corridor

08/12/2014 - 08:00
Westcoastway announces that the Provincial Minister of Finance, Economic Development and Tourism, Alan Winde, as well as the United Nations Development Fund (UNDF) have pledged their support of, and commitment to the development of tourism and economic opportunity on the Cape’s West Coast to establish a biodiversity corridor as well as a potential Mega Game Reserve. read more
Best of the Cape - your best of Nature

Best of the Cape - your best of Nature

06/10/2013 - 10:33
021 asks Capetonians about their most memorable moment with nature: Sagess Kongo: Looking at the clouds settling on the mountain in Winter. Beautiful!

Morne Crook: Going up Devil’s peak. It was a bit tiring but it was all worth it when we reached the top. The views were out of this world!

Firdows Jardien: Seeing a whale in Camps Bay with my family. It’s definitely not something you see every day!

Michael Siphiwo: In 1974 when I saw an elephant walking on the land below Rhodes Memorial.* read more
CLIMBING UP LION'S HEAD ON A FULL MOON

CLIMBING UP LION'S HEAD ON A FULL MOON

02/10/2013 - 14:25
021 joins the trail of people who
hike up Lion’s Head on full moon. read more
The Mystical Mountain, a meditation

The Mystical Mountain, a meditation

01/10/2013 - 09:41
Metaphysical teacher Natalia Baker tells 021 readers how to connect with Table Mountain’s healing energy. read more
TABLE MOUNTAIN IS SPECIAL

TABLE MOUNTAIN IS SPECIAL

01/10/2013 - 00:00
As the poet William Blake wrote, “Great things are done when men and mountains meet.” Even if we never abseil, or seldom drink the wine produced on its slopes, and only glimpse it in our rear-view mirror on the drive to work, Table Mountain is part of all our lives. read more
SHARKS IN THE CAPE

SHARKS IN THE CAPE

26/07/2013 - 17:52
One popular statistic points out the danger electric toasters pose to homo sapiens (600 deaths yearly), as compared to that of being eaten by a shark (about 20). Or that of being killed by malaria (2 million), stung by a wasp (100) or hit on the head by a falling coconut (150 times fatal ouch). These comparisons are standard procedure in most shark exhibits in natural history museums or public aquaria. In the new slick Aquarium in Reunion Island for instance, a diagram shows two bubbles: the large one represents the average yearly 100 deaths on Reunion’s road system, while a teeny tiny one symbolises the two fatalities caused by sharks.
 read more
SHARK SPOTTER IN FALSE BAY

SHARK SPOTTER IN FALSE BAY

26/07/2013 - 17:49
For most of us, summer spells sand, sea and sun, but for Monwabisi Sikweyiya, it spells shark!

“Every day is a headache for me,” says Monwabisi Sikweyiya, field supervisor of the shark spotters. As we speak, his attention and hands are continually drawn to the two-way radio that beeps intermittently throughout our conversation. “I never turn this off,” he says, picking up and fondling the device. “I’m always checking what’s happening. Even when I have a day off.”

Monwabisi is monitoring the 25 shark spotters strategically situated along the coastline of False Bay, which has one of the highest densities of great white sharks in the world. The spotters, who sound an alarm when a shark comes within a mile of the shore, are paid R26 per hour and work five-hour shifts, from 8am–1pm and 1–6pm.

The phrase that Monwabisi most dreads hearing is “shark attack”.
 read more
DIVING WITH SHARKS

DIVING WITH SHARKS

26/07/2013 - 17:46
A hot day, the water is calm, the visibility perfect. The likelihood of seeing sharks? 100 percent! This certainty, never to be experienced in the wild (not even in False Bay, one of the world’s shark hot spots), is what draws Malvina, Kerri and me to an 11am dive at the Two Oceans Aquarium.

Ever since I made the booking, I found myself dreaming of sharks. The night before the dive, I even woke up from such a dream: my family had gathered around the tank in which I was about to dive, only for my stepbrother to point out that there are white sharks circling in it. “Don’t go into it, they are dangerous.”

“No,” I explained to him, “there are no white sharks, just harmless normal ones.”

But are they really? Lance, our diving instructor, soothes our concern about the predators. “The ragged-tooth sharks, all females, and all harmless to humans, live here because they were rescued, or because they were introduced for research purposes. The sharks stay with us for six months to three years. They're fed every Sunday and even get vitamins or antibiotics in case they need it.”
 read more
CITY SAFARI: HIPPOS AND PELICANS IN RONDEVLEI

CITY SAFARI: HIPPOS AND PELICANS IN RONDEVLEI

04/03/2013 - 07:37
Want to get away from it all? Dawn Kennedy discovers tranquillity – and Africa’s most dangerous animal – right in the middle of the city.


Whoever penned the famous phrase about the journey being more important than the destination had clearly never tried to cross Prince George Drive during rush hour to reach Rondevlei Nature Reserve. Hands sweating, gripping the steering wheel tightly, I beep with fury, cursing the rush hour, the apex of our cultural madness.

Battling through traffic, I fix my aim on Imvubu Island. Nothing signals tranquillity more than an island. The very word sounds like a sigh and makes me think of undisturbed peace. They say that no man is an island, but it’s on an island that we can feel most at one with ourselves. Perhaps, surrounded by water, we are reminded of our embryonic existence before entering the madness of this world.

 read more
THE LIGHT SIDE Don't ask me, I'm Dr.D: What is the table cloth on top of Table Mountain and how is it formed?

THE LIGHT SIDE Don't ask me, I'm Dr.D: What is the table cloth on top of Table Mountain and how is it formed?

01/01/2013 - 00:00
WHAT IS THE TABLE CLOTH
ON TOP OF TABLE MOUNTAIN
AND HOW IS IT FORMED?
– JOHAN STEINBEK, PAARL read more
THE LIGHT SIDE Don't ask me, I'm Dr.D: Why is Table Mountain flat?

THE LIGHT SIDE Don't ask me, I'm Dr.D: Why is Table Mountain flat?

01/01/2013 - 00:00
DR. D., WHY IS TABLE MOUNTAIN FLAT?
- MAVIS DAVIS, BISHOPS LAVIS read more
THE LIGHT SIDE  Don't ask me, I'm Dr.D: Why is there a difference in the temperature between the two oceans?

THE LIGHT SIDE Don't ask me, I'm Dr.D: Why is there a difference in the temperature between the two oceans?

01/01/2013 - 00:00
WHY IS THERE A DIFFERENCE IN THE TEMPERATURE
BETWEEEN THE TWO OCEANS?
ART GARFUNKLE, SIMON'S TOWN read more
HOT SPRINGS IN THE CAPE

HOT SPRINGS IN THE CAPE

01/01/2013 - 00:00
Unless you are impervious to cold fronts battering the Cape in winter, chances are you will appreciate South Africa’s
aquatic wonderlands known as hot springs. Of the 86 registered springs across the country, approximately a dozen are in the Western Cape. Used by nomadic hunters and gatherers for thousands of years, most were only “discovered” in the 1700s. Since then, many have been transformed into luxurious spas but a few remain known to an eclectic community of hot-water lovers only. read more
TABLE MOUNTAIN MEMORIES

TABLE MOUNTAIN MEMORIES

01/01/2013 - 00:00
What the mountain means to me... Well-known Capetonians reflect on their most special moments with the landmark. read more
CITY SAFARI: BIRD-WATCHING AT MILNERTON'S RIETVLEI

CITY SAFARI: BIRD-WATCHING AT MILNERTON'S RIETVLEI

11/12/2012 - 15:54
The black skimmer is a tern-like seabird that is native to the Americas. It breeds in North and South America. Northern populations usually winter in the warmer waters of the Caribbean and Pacific coasts, while the South American populations make only shorter movements in response to annual floods. The bird is known for “skimming” the water surface in low flight as it searches for food. read more
CITY SAFARI: LEOPARDS IN THE BOLAND

CITY SAFARI: LEOPARDS IN THE BOLAND

23/09/2012 - 10:09
Residents in the Cape Winelands are not only blessed with great wine and important historic architecture, but also with wild cats in their back yard.
The Boland Project camera trap survey was initiated in March 2010. It observes an area that covers 2000km², incorporating the Limietberg and Du Toit's Kloof mountains overlooking Paarl, the Jonkershoek mountains near Stellenbosch, the Hottentots-Holland Mountains in the Grabouw area, the Helderberg mountains of Somerset West and the Steenbras mountains above Gordon's Bay. So far, the project has identified 52 adult leopards. At least 11 leopards live in the Helderberg and Kogelberg reserves. Caracal (rooikat) and African wildcat (vaalboskat) are also seen in the area.  read more
CITY SAFARI: CHACMA BABOONS

CITY SAFARI: CHACMA BABOONS

15/03/2012 - 12:41
When Portuguese explorer Vasco da Gama first sighted the Cape of Good Hope in 1497, he was met with the unusual sight of baboons foraging on the beach. Five centuries later, 021 tracks down a troop of Chacma baboons who still enjoy a marine diet. read more
THE EUCALYPT TREES OF OUDE MOLEN

THE EUCALYPT TREES OF OUDE MOLEN

01/01/2012 - 00:00
Bernard Franz reflects on nature under the eucalypt trees of Oude Molen. After all, nature is the circumference, beacon and centre of Cape Town’s topography. read more
CITY SAFARI: AFRICAN PENGUINS IN BOULDERS

CITY SAFARI: AFRICAN PENGUINS IN BOULDERS

03/10/2011 - 18:14
Taking a media group on a tour to visit the African penguins at Boulders Beach is one of the more subdued events in Justin Buchmann’s life. As a highly-trained antipoaching agent and an expert in wildlife capture, he’s got plenty of tales of derring-do in the bush – from the time that he fell off the back of a bakkie in Kruger when he was catching a giraffe and unwittingly walked past a pride of nine lionesses, to last night when he arrested two abalone poachers. read more
CELEBRATING SNOEK

CELEBRATING SNOEK

01/06/2011 - 00:00
Surely one of the great pleasures of life in the Cape is being able to feed an entire family, or group of friendS, with a huge Snoek bought for a few rand. Dawn Kennedy went to meet the fishermen from kalk bay who bring home the Snoek. It’s 2pm at Kalk Bay harbour and Kalkies’ second boat is emptying its catch for the day. there are few places where you will get a better sense of nature’s abundance. Slimy fish spew onto the concrete like silver coins. Women wearing overalls and Wellingtons haul the snoek, some of which reach up to their waists, onto stone slabs where they get gutting and cleaning. It’s visceral, bloody work and not for the squeamish. There something ancient about the scene. You can’t be in a hurry to buy fish. They can’t be caught to a schedule. Waiting around the harbour is part of the ritual. Frenzied schedules are forced aside as you slow down and smell the life aquatic.  read more
NATURAL WINTER WONDERS

NATURAL WINTER WONDERS

01/06/2011 - 00:00
Discover a winter-flowering Cape Orchid:
Disperis capensis was described by the innovative Swedish scientist Carl Linnaeus in 1760, from a specimen collected at the Cape in the late 17th century. This orchid is widespread in the Cape Floristic Region from the Matsikammaberg near Vanrhynsdorp, south through the Cederberg to the Cape Peninsula, and ranging eastwards to Port Elizabeth and Grahamstown. It occurs from near sea-level to altitudes over 1700m. During the cold months of July and August, when flowering orchids may least be expected in the fynbos-covered mountains of the Cape Peninsula, these striking floral jewels are frequently seen. Often hooked into the restio reeds and fynbos shrubs alongside which they grow, variously coloured forms range from rosypurple or lilac to the more rare white, with the petal margins suffused in darker hues.
 read more
CITY SAFARI: SOUTHERN RIGHT WHALES

CITY SAFARI: SOUTHERN RIGHT WHALES

01/06/2011 - 00:00
Bernard Franz reflects on the changing relationship between whales and humans.

“It's WhalIng Season again!” As an indication of how our world can change fundamentally in a few lifetimes, this ancient collective cry to gather harpoons, sharp stonesor blubber tanks has given in to appreciation for one of the world’s largest animals. As only a handful of super-rich countries continue to slaughter whales commercially for reasons that make sense only to themselves, whales have become a symbol of intelligence and, strikingly, of frailty. And with that, at last, humanity has begun to really care for them.
 read more
HIKE: WHEN THE MOUNTAIN COMES ALIVE

HIKE: WHEN THE MOUNTAIN COMES ALIVE

01/06/2011 - 00:00
Jerome Davis describes, in loving detail, his favourite winter hike.

All through the scorching summer, the seeds, bulbs and root balls of the fynbos hide from the sun, underground, waiting for the winter rains. it starts gently, with mist condensing on cool rocks, clouds licking mountaintops; then the drizzle starts and soaks through the soil that sucks it in and feeds it down to the sleeping life beneath. Lichens swell out from dead flat grey to vibrant orange, red and green, splashing the rocks with abstract graffiti. Minute ferns unfurl from cracks, the fat tips of bulbous leaves burst through the wet sand crowded with nodding flowers. This reawakening marks the start of the best season for walking in cape town – by far. read more
CITY SAFARI: WILDLIFE AROUND THE MOUNTAIN

CITY SAFARI: WILDLIFE AROUND THE MOUNTAIN

15/10/2010 - 00:00
As Cape Town is rated the world’s most biologically diverse city, it seems like a good idea to take a tour around the city’s mountain to appreciate its natural riches.

In the Company Gardens (that may soon become the city’s third UNESCO world heritage site) grows a pear tree, fenced with Victorian cast-iron posts and planted in 1652 by the fi rst Cape governor, Jan van Riebeeck. To some, it symbolises colonialism; to others, it’s a reminder of early globalisation.
 read more
 
the cape town opera one & only rupert museum the fugard theatre addis in cape cape philharmonic orchestra cape town ballet cape tourist guide connection Grand West Casino sanlam village & life aubergine iziko kirstenbosch gardens baxter theatre table mountain aerial cableway arts and culture artscape rust en vrede south african national parks vida cafe